MOBILE, Ala (WALA) – The number of patients with COVID-19 at Alabama hospitals reached a record number on Thursday, despite that there is some good news on a treatment for those with COVID and it has been used at Mobile hospitals for months.

Local hospitals say the experimental drug Remdesivir is working.

Remdesivir

This file photo shows vials of the drug remdesivir. Researchers have found evidence that the experimental drug might help patients recover more quickly from the novel coronavirus.

“We are many months into COVID-19 in the hospital,” said Dr. Bill Admire, Mobile Infirmary’s Chief Medical Officer. “Remdesivir has shown positive results in our patients.”

At Mobile Infirmary alone, Dr. Admire said they have treated more than 200 patients with Remdesivir since getting it in May.

In a study done by the company that makes the drug they found it considerably reduces deaths by about 60% and shortened recovery.

“Remdesivir has been published in articles that it decreases the length of stay by almost four days on patients who have coronavirus,” Dr. Admire said. “It’s a very helpful thing because you can discharge people quicker and allows more beds to open up for other patients who have COVID.”

Other Mobile hospitals are also seeing the benefit in the anti-viral medication given through an IV.

“Of all the things that we’ve thrown at COVID that Redmesivir is the most effective thing that they’ve gotten to use in treating our patients,” said Jeffery St. Clair, President and CEO at Springhill Medical Center.

Doctors said Remdesivir is successful when it is used in combination with other drugs and steroids. While it is in short supply nationwide, both Springhill Medical Center and Mobile Infirmary say they have enough to treat the people who need it.

“We still have supplies here at Infirmary Health System at Mobile Infirmary and we’re still able to treat our community with Remdesivir when needed,” Dr. Admire said.

While the drug has not been given broad FDA approval, the agency gave it emergency authorization to use on COVID-19 patients.

All content © 2020, WALA; Mobile, AL. (A Meredith Corporation Station). All Rights Reserved.  

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